Make your Heart Disease-Free!

One morning when you woke up and you looked at yourself in the mirror—you noticed something. You gained weight.

Worst is, it is not just a couple of pounds, but it is something that is noticeable. Even your friends would not patronize you, but you would expect a rather frank feedback such as, “You are leaning towards the lofty side.”

With all the food binging in the past holidays, which include the celebration of the Year of the Golden Tiger, gaining weight is something that most people should watch out for. There was an article that was published on MedicalNewsToday.com that says being slightly overweight or getting obese may lead to an increase of risk of having a heart disease.

World Health Organization (WHO) said that coronary heart disease accounts for about 17 million (approximately 30%) deaths annually throughout the world. It is estimated that by 2010, heart disease will be the leading cause of death in the world.

Alarming isn’t it?

Remember, even if men are likely to have heart disease as study show, still it is something that the female species should be careful, too.

There are actually two risk of getting a heart disease: the uncontrollable and the controllable factors.

Here are five tips to preventing heart disease:

If you smoke, better stop or you’d be sorry—that is the first one!

No matter how ‘glamorized’ smoking is as portrayed in the entertainment industry, think not just twice or three times. Be it a cigarette or a cigar—bear in mind that nicotine in such products, aside from being addictive, when it is inhaled—it will go through the bloodstream and into the lungs. Nicotine can also be absorbed via the mouth’s lining and it dissolves quickly in the saliva; in the process it makes the smoker dependent without inhalation of nicotine due to its alkaline properties.

Smoking can also lead to several cancers e.g. lip, tongue, mouth and throat.

Also, in a 25-year study published in a Journal of American Association, it states that smokers may develop as much as 27% more risk for coronary heart disease than that of nonsmoker.

Get Active, Get Physical.

Get your butt off from your lazy seats. Sweat it out somewhere. To keep you healthy and have a healthier heart, physical activities such as swimming, cycling, jogging, biking, walking and more—are  just some of those exercises whether included in a program or routine—it still adds to a healthy lifestyle.

An ideal, 30-minute of moderate physical activity for five days, at least is advisable for 18 to 65 years of age.

Eat a heart-healthy diet—try the South Beach diet!

The ‘accidental’ diet doctor and author of The South Beach Diet, cardiologist Arthur Agatston’s eating plan do offer his patience with promise of losing weight, improving their cholesterol and avoiding diabetes and heart diseases.

Like what was mentioned earlier, obesity weighs on the heart. It is very simple, avoid greasy food stuff that will bombard excess cholesterol that will line the arteries and will cause a gradual narrowing and in the process damages the heart muscle.

For a more detailed food South Beach Diet, click here!

Maintain a healthy weight.

Take note of this: it may be difficult to lose weight instantly. You may have to work hard on it, but a good start is by losing at least 10% of you total body weight. Somehow if you are able to do that, it can lower the risk of acquiring heart disease.

To monitor your weight, WellnessPRO do offer several scales to check your weight from time to time.

Get regular health checkups.

Visiting your doctor may be expensive, but it could be inexpensive if you maintain a regular health checkup that will help you monitor and prevent from succumbing to high blood pressure and high cholesterol, which these two are reasons to damaging your heart and blood vessels. Having such routine—it can already give you a better idea based from the results whether you need to relax or take necessary actions.

To gauge your blood pressure and cholesterol levels are both a-okay, here is how: Optimal blood pressure is less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury, while having a total cholesterol level less than 200 mg/dL puts you at a much lower risk for a coronary heart disease.

For more information about blood pressure and cholesterol levels—your healthcare provider can help you interpret your cholesterol numbers based on other risk factors e.g. age, gender, family history, race, smoking, high blood pressure, physical inactivity, obesity and diabetes.

All of these tips can assure you of a better and healthier lifestyle. There is still truth to the saying: ‘An ounce of prevention is better than any cure.’

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